logo-final

News

Fighting the Good Fight

Written by Administrator.

alt

Dr. Lillian Lasaten-Ebuen recently received the Dr. Steve Koral Award from the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT).

The award is recognition for her dedication and tireless campaign in promoting mercury-free dentistry not only in the Philippines but in the whole of Southeast Asia. Last month, Dr. Ebuen, upon invitation of the Center for Community Health and Injury Prevention in Vietnam(CCHIP), conducted a series of mercury-free dentistry lectures to dentistry students and dental professionals.

If you are familiar with Dr. Ebuen's work, she is passionate about mercury-free dentistry and her dental office assures that equipment and skills of personnel are up to standards. Dr Ebuen also uses non-mercury fillings and for dental amalgam removals, she strictly adheres to the protocols for safety set by IAOMT.

So, congratulations for the award Dr Ebuen and let us continue with our campaign towards mercury-free dentistry.

Healthy Teeth, Healthy Body, No Mercury.

For any questions regarding mercury-free dentistry services, please call us at (+632) 727.8665.

Green Dentistry

Written by Administrator.

Eco-friendly or Green are buzzwords often used by marketing folks to sell a product. In a time where there is a growing concern for the environment and what we can do as consumers, these words can help sell a product or service, whether you are a hardcore environmentalist or not. Unfortunately, the terms can also be abused and trick costumers into purchasing products or services that are far from what it advertises.

For a quick definition, eco-friendly or green simply means that it is not harmful to the environment or at least, takes conscious efforts in controlling or minimizing its harm to the environment. It is a noteworthy endeavour and hardly a fad.

For dentists, the wake-up call is here. Today, dentistry is becoming aware of its impact on the environment and an increasing number of dental professionals are taking steps into setting up a dental practice that is friendly to patients and the environment,

But what does it take to be an eco-friendly dentist?

Essentially, green dentists observe these basic rules:

Biocompatibility

The dental sector uses a variety of toxic materials. From dental amalgam fillings to fluoride and to metal crowns. Green dentists are aware of the toxic nature of these materials and, taking the mouth and body connection into account, instead use biocompatible materials to minimize impact and repair damage.

Mercury-free dental fillings for example are non-toxic and less invasive. Application does less damage to the tooth and ensures that tooth integrity is maintained. 

The International Association of Oral Medicine (IAOMT) in the Philippines is the local chapter of IAOMT in the US, this research organization advocates mercury-free dentistry and offers trainings to dental professionals for a minimal fee.alt

IAOMT-Philippines' Dr Ebuen, demonstrates proper amalgam removal

Considers the Overall Health of the Patient

A green dentist plays multiple roles. Aside from being a dental health practitioner, a green dentist is also a teacher, a counsellor, and an advocate. She or he recognizes that dental health is a part of a whole and it directly affects a person's overall health. She or he also takes the time in explaining the pros and cons of dental procedures to patients, ensuring that the patient is well-informed before proceeding with the treatment.

Utilizes Modern Technology

Using cutting-edge dental equipment not only simplifies work but it also minimizes the use of toxic materials. Digital imaging in lieu of traditional X-Rays lessen X-Ray exposure and the use of toxic X-Ray films.

Reduces Environmental Impact

In-line with modern tech, installing equipment such as amalgam separators minimize mercury pollution. Using eco-friendly sanitizers, disinfectants, and other cleaning agents also help reduce dentistry's environmental impact. Minimizing the use of disposable items such as bibs help lessen the burden on landfills.

Uses Minimal Resources

Dental offices need a lot of electricity and water to power equipment. By simply changing habits, such as turning off equipment and lights when not in use are simple steps in reducing consumption energy and water consumption.

If you are worried about your impact on the environment, find an eco-friendly dentist that can relate with your concerns. We are here to listen and offer advice, give us a call at 632.727.8665.

The Choice Is Yours

Written by Administrator.

alt

We at Total Body Dentistry advocate the Patient's Right to Information.

Part of this is informing the patient of the risks involved in removing dental amalgam fillings. The International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT) - with their infographic above - explains that the process of removing - much like placing or handling dental amalgam - releases mercury into the air: whether through mercury vapors or through microscopic debris.

However, if the patient is properly informed of the risks - he or she should have the right to choose to go with through with the process or not.

When the patient does, we urge the patient to find a dental office equipped with the latest technology that's able to handle such a risky process. Most importantly, find a dentist who is trained on how to perform the process - safely. 

Please get in touch with us for any concerns or questions regarding dental amalgam fillings. Call us at (632) 7235167. 

More Than Aesthetics

Written by Administrator.

alt

With the introduction of quality materials and less invasive procedures, consumer and professional interest in cosmetic dental treatments has been increasing. However, cosmetic dentistry is not a recognized field of specialty since by definition, it only pertains to work related to improving the appearance (and not necessarily the functionality) of teeth and gums.

This definition can be challenged though; since dental implants and tooth restoration with non-mercury fillings help improve the functionality and look of teeth and gums. The desire to achieve that perfect Hollywood smile seems shallow but aside from aesthetics, cosmetic dentistry offer other benefits.

Skewed teeth for instance can cause chronic headaches or chewing problems and cracked teeth can lead to gum disease. Cosmetic dentistry can also help expand the patient be more responsible when it comes to dental care.

Currently, there are several cosmetic dental treatments available. From teeth whitening to veneers to implants to onlays/inlays and composite bonding. Technological advances continue to develop and advance methods, consequently minimizing pain and treatment period.

Yet, only a number of patients avail of cosmetic treatments. According to a US study, the lack of consumer education plus its prohibitive cost intimidate patients from taking advantage - let alone inquiring - about such procedures.

In due time, with increasing awareness, demand, and technological advancements, cosmetic dentistry may finally reach its full bloom.

Thank You For Not Smoking

Written by Administrator.

alt

To some, smoking may be sexy or cool but the flipside is less glamorous. Cigarette packs come with a surgeon general’s warning and it is there for a reason.

An article on the Care 2 website lists down the number of ingredients that can be found in cigarettes. More than tobacco leaves; the article names over a dozen elements ranging from arsenic to formaldehyde, cadmium and so on. The BBC takes it a step further and it specified 599 ingredients wrapped neatly in that roll of paper. Apparently, these components were thrown in, as to reduce the cigarette's bitter aftertaste and to increase an individual’s craving for tobacco.

The consequences of these ingredients are bone chilling. Smoking leads to a number of health concerns that damage not only the teeth but the respiratory system as well. Halitosis, bone shrinking, gums recession, cancer, heart disease, and a lot of crippling illnesses – are all part and parcel of smoking.

As mentioned earlier, tobacco and smoking affects how gum tissues. Smoking causes gums to recede and their function to protect teeth are greatly reduced while increasing the chances of developing gum disease. The nicotine in tobacco also constricts blood flow. Impaired blood flow limits the flow of oxygen throughout the body leading to further complications and other health conditions. Recent research has also shown that second hand smokers are also placed at risk – not only from cancer – but also to periodontal disease.

All this information leads to no other logical recourse but to quit tobacco but sadly, that is easier said than done. If you smoke, here are suggestions. Remember that early detection is worth a thousand treatments.

-  Visit the dentist regularly.
-  Practice good oral hygiene. Brush, floss, and use a mouthwash.
-  Check for symptoms such as lesions, sores, red patches under the tongue. If these symptoms doesn’t clear up in two weeks, it’s time to visit the doctor.

We urge everyone to not take smoking lightly cause aside from the unsighlty gums and teeth, it will lead to even more serious problems. Call us for an appointment at +632.727.8665.

References:

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/the-shocking-ingredients-in-cigarettes.html#13721416803171&action=collapse_widget&id=4860179
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/sci_tech/features/health/tobaccotrial/inacigarette599.htm
http://www.healthyteeth.org/tobacco/
http://www.studiodentaire.com/articles/en/smoking_affects_dental_and_oral_health.php
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

Let’s Talk Dentures

Written by Dan Abril.

alt

Dentures are interesting as it is a dental procedure that blends science and art. Depending on the artistic and technical skill of the dentist, dentures can make or break a person's appearance. In the hands of a very talented dentist, dentures can look natural and complement a patient's facial features.

From Bones to Resins

Interestingly enough, the application of dentures is not a modern day technique. Since around 7000 BC, dentures were already being made from human and animal teeth. With industrialization and the increased consumption of sugar, tooth decay has become more prevalent and demand for dentures increased. By then, dentures were made from horse's teeth, elephant or hippopotamus ivory, and human teeth extracted from fallen soldiers, executed criminals, and poor folks desperate to make a quick buck. These materials were easily worn and eventually were replaced by porcelain.

These days, porcelain is still used is and one of the more popular choices because of its close resemblance to natural teeth. However, porcelain can be easily chipped or broken. The introduction of acrylic, offered a sturdier and less expensive option to porcelain. Whatever "tooth"€ is used, these are set in either an acrylic resin, plastic, or metal framework.

Denture Types

There are two types of dentures: full and partial. Partial dentures are used to replace a couple or more missing teeth and are typically held in place by a plastic/resin and metal framework. Meanwhile, a full denture or "false teeth" is for patients with no remaining teeth. These also come in two types: the conventional full denture or an immediate full denture.

Conventional dentures are fitted into the patient after some period of recovery while an immediate denture is fitted into the patient directly after tooth extraction. While immediate dentures offer the convenience of not having to experience being toothless, keep in mind that gums and bones recede during the healing process, and immediate dentures may need to be retrofitted or be eventually replaced with conventional dentures

The Pros and Cons

Like any dental or medical procedure, dentures have a list of advantages and disadvantages.

Pros:

Less expensive and less intrusive than implants.

Provide structure to the face.

Robust eating as chewing and biting is easier.

Aesthetics.

Disadvantages:

Without adequate care, dentures can cause damage and infection to surrounding teeth and gums.

Ill-fitting dentures can cause headaches, eating difficulties, and even lead to embarrassing moments such as moving or falling out of place at the most inappropriate moment.

Concerns about materials used leaching toxins into the body causing allergies, stomatitis, and oral cavity deterioration.

Note however that concerns regarding the biocompatibility of dentures are continually being examined and tested and to date, patients' reactions to the materials need further study as results remain inconclusive. If you have apprehensions to dentures, dental implants can be a more reliable alternative to dentures but as it is largely dependent on the overall oral health quality of the patient, implants are on the suggestion of the dentist.

For any questions or concerns, please feel free to get in touch with us at +632.727.8665 to schedule an appointment.

References:

http://www.premierexhibitions.com/exhibitions/4/4/bodies-exhibition/blog/edentulous-brief-history-dentures

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-health-dentures#1

http://thedenturepeople.co.uk/understanding-your-dentures/

http://purecuretechnology.com/denture-health.html

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/08959374920060011401?journalCode=adra